Pope Francis Condemns All Religious Fundamentalisms

The Roman Catholic Church has apparently “had it up to here” (as the old cliche goes) with religious fundamentalism inside its own church and outside of it. During a recent trip to the former Soviet state of Azerbaijan, Pope Francis condemned religious fundamentalism in all of its varieties in an address before Muslims, Christians, Jews, and adherents of other faiths.  Here is the money quote:

From this highly symbolic place, a heartfelt cry rises up once again: no more violence in the name of God!  May his most holy name be adored, not profaned or bartered as a commodity through forms of hatred and human opposition…God cannot be used for personal interests and selfish ends; he cannot be used to justify any form of fundamentalism, imperialism or colonialism.

You may read the rest of the article from which this quote came at the following safe link:

Pope Francis: Don’t Use God to Justify Fundamentalism

Christian fundamentalists in the United States do not believe the Roman Catholic Church is a representative of Jesus Christ, and they do not believe Roman Catholic parishioners (church members) are authentic Christians. Indeed, throughout the 20th century and even into this century, Christian fundamentalism in the United States has been focused on three major acts of militancy against the Roman Catholic Church:

(1)  Denounce the Roman Catholic Church as a worldwide system of evil and a false church

(2)  Convert Catholics to Christian fundamentalism to save them from certain Hell

(3)   Associate Roman Catholicism with the side of Satan in “end times” speculations

Roman Catholic recognition of all the pain and suffering religious fundamentalism causes around the world (including Christian fundamentalism and conservative evangelicalism) is welcome, and we are glad to see the leader of the largest mainline Christian church in the world speaking out against it.

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